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The Motherhood Movement ~You Say You Want A Revolution, The Film

The film, ‘The Motherhood Movement’ – You Say You Want a Revolution captures the first ever, international summit on the Motherhood Movement, featuring Motherhood organizations. Directed by Joy Rose, Produced by The Museum Of Motherhood, in collaboration with the Association For Research On Mothering (ARM) and The Motherhood Foundation Inc (MFI). The film seeks to promote, showcase, and make visible maternal discussion and to disseminate information on the subject of Feminist/activist Mothers and the missions of International Maternal agencies.

Over 23 organizations were represented at the first ever global summit at the Association For Research and Mothering Conference (ARM), York University on October 25, 26th in Toronto, CA 2008.

We have documented and preserved presentations, interviews and perspectives on the burgeoning ‘Mom Movement’. Subjects include, but are not limited to: The Motherhood Movement as an important part of women’s studies, activism, the three feminist waves, where are we now? Feminist Mothering, woman and mothers in the arts, non-traditional parenting, women and families; poor and immigrant issues, the 1950’s until now, mothers and politics, mothers and the economy, motherhood unpaid, mother-work, the gift economy, matriarchal and indigenous societies, the role of men and feminist values, future museum of Motherhood, formation of an international movement.

Organizations represented include:

Andrea O’Reilly (Founder, ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH ON MOTHERING (ARM)
Joy Rose (Founder & President, MAMAPALOOZA and Executive Director, MOTHERHOOD FOUNDATION)
Alexia Nye Jackson (MOTHER, THE JOB)
Anita Shawhanks (author, ADOLESCENT PREGNANCY)
Amy Hudock (literarymama.com)
Jewelles Smith (DISABLED WOMENS NETWORK OF CANADA)
Mary Olivella (momsrising.org)
Amy Richards (THIRD WAVE FOUNDATION)
Tiloma Jayasinghe (Staff Attorney, NATIONAL ADVOCATES FOR PREGNANT WOMEN)Heide Goettner (INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY FOR MODERN MATRIARCHAL STUDIES)
Oleru Huda (Parliament, Uganda)
Rebekah Spicuglia (NON CUSTODIAL PARENT COMMUNITY)
Gayle Brandeis (CODE PINK)
Audette Shephard (Chair, UNITED MOTHERS OPPOSING VIOLENCE EVERYWHERE (UMOVE))
Amy Anderson (MAMAZINE)
Jennifer Niesslein (Co-founder, BRAIN, CHILD)
Laura Jiminez (SISTER SONG WOMEN OF COLOR REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH COLLECTIVE)
Amber Kinser (Author, MOTHERING IN THE THIRD WAVE)
Genevieve Vaughan (INTERNATIONAL FEMINISTS FOR A GIFT ECONOMY)
Lynn Kuechle (Board, MUSEUM OF MOTHERHOOD (coming, 2010)
Enola Aird (THE MOTHERHOOD PROECT)
Lorri Slepian and Linda Lisi Juergens (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MOTHERCENTERS)
Pat Gowens and THE WELFARE WARRIORS
Melanie Dernak (NATIONAL ORGANIZATION OF WOMEN (NOW)
Rebecca Ruhlen (Breastfeeding Advocacy)
Jill Evans Petzall (Filmmaker, WHEN THE BOW BREAKS and VERONICA’S STORY
Beth Osnes and Julianna Forbes (MOTHERS ACTING UP)
Here’s A Clip:

Inspiring Women – Bell Hooks

” As all advocates of feminist politics know most people do not understand sexism or if they do they think it is not a problem. Masses of people think that feminism is always and only about women seeking to be equal to men. And a huge majority of these folks think feminism is anti-male. Their misunderstanding of feminist politics reflects the reality that most folks learn about feminism from patriarchal mass media.”

Women in HerStory- Jovita Idár 1885-1946

 

Jovita Idár 1885-1946

 

“Working women know their rights and proudly rise to face the struggle. The hour of their degradation is past…. Women are no longer servants but rather the equals of men, companions to them”

 

 

Jovita Idár was born in 1885 into a Laredo family of journalists. She and her brothers worked for their father’s newspaper, La Crónica, writing articles that condemned racial prejudice and violence. When the Idars arranged for the First Mexican Congress in 1911, Jovita organized the women who attended. From their efforts sprang the Mexican Feminist League, which provided free education for Tejano children.

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These ARE the Good Old Days By: Amber Kinser *Dr. Mama*

These ARE the Good Old Days

By: Amber Kinser

My daughter just finished her first year in college.   A terrific year for her and, I’m happy to say, not a fiscally draining one for me.  I sure hope the next “three” years go this way (the quotes are there because few graduates get through the Bachelor’s degree in 4 years).  She is supported, as a Tennessee resident attending a public college, by the “Hope Scholarship” (funds generated by lottery revenue) and by her own performing arts scholarship, so she covers most of her costs on her own, though said costs are certainly supplemented by me.  This is a support I give not always unwincingly but never begrudgingly, remembering as I do the paucity of my own college finances, which spanned a ridiculous number of years.  I am happy for the financial relief overall, but mostly I am happy that she is learning the benefit of being self-sufficient which, for her and many other women—many of whom are mothers and others who are not—includes the support of the state or, in a more abstract sense, “the state.”  Of course even if the years leading to her degree continue in this same vein, this is no indication in today’s economy (I hate using the “e” word, sounds so foul anymore) of future self-sufficiency for her and her college grad peers.

And this brings me back to my topic, a most time-honored and respectable one:  Me.  I ought be celebrating my supplements to her finances a bit more eagerly than I do, I fear.  At least for now she is living on-campus, between bouts of roommate, dating, or sleep deprivation trauma anyway.  And one less person in the house no matter who it is—her, me, my partner, my son—is easier.  Subtract any one of us and the number of relationships and complexities that must be managed decreases exponentially; everyone in my house will attest to this certainty, perhaps especially when I’m the subtracted element.  And at least she is child-free, so far anyway, and that means that she is able to put much energy into herself and stretch her finances and passions and waking hours within, rather than beyond, their breaking point.   And at least we are both immanently hopeful about her future, save for times when my partner reads aloud the latest dismal predictions by the New York Times anyway.  And that means we can project long, hope big, and think broad (please forgive those adjectives where there should be adverbs; poetic license and all that).

But this may be a temporary thing.  I am reminded of this truth rather frequently, at least weekly in fact, in my partner’s endearing read-alouds:  “for recent generations, long road to adulthood,” and “more people in their 20s are also living with their parents” were last Sunday’s happy announcements.  He shares these delectables with a smirk but I can see the terror in his eyes as he thinks about his own sons, 27 and 28 and college graduates both, moving into our basement room.  And that of course may be the best case scenario for us financially—they may have partners and children of their own, and when they flip for who gets the bed and who gets the couches down there, they’ll have to figure out how to make a coin have three sides, since my daughter might well call dibs on sleeping space herself; by then her younger brother may have claimed her room, relinquishing his own to my mother, but that’s the subject of another blog.  I have enjoyed my own financial self-sufficiency for only a precious few years so far (remember my ridiculous number of years in college) and man-o-man does it ever not suck and wow am I ever loathe for that to shift.  But this may well be the reality I am facing so I think the next time I write a check for my daughter, I’ll take a picture of myself holding it up and smiling, rejoicing.  So that when I look back on these as the good old days, I’ll know I enjoyed them while they lasted.

Bio:

Amber Kinser *Dr Mama*

Amber Kinser is a feminist writer and feminist mother of a college-aged daughter and a teen son in a blended family in the U.S. Mountain South.  Contrary to popular belief, there IS a liberal character to the South and Dr. Mama is part of it.  She has lots to say about women, gender, and families in the South and North and everywhere.

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